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Horse Trailer Cost-A guide with example prices

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So you just bought a horse. Congratulations. If this is your first time shopping for a trailer, it is crucial that you research before committing to any one particular brand or type of trailer. And most critical is what you can expect to spend.

The costs of basic horse trailers vary greatly. They can range from $2,000 to $30,000 depending on their size, hauling capacity, weight, and material used to construct it. The cost can go up if you have a gooseneck hitch or add living quarters.

Because horse trailers are expensive, I recommend hauling with several friends who each have different model trailers. This way, you’ll learn which features are most important and save yourself some money down the road. Happy hauling!

Picture of a basic two-horse trailer.
Basic bumper-pull horse trailer.

This blog post will go over some things to consider when purchasing a trailer for your horse so you feel confident in your decision when looking at different options available. Here are some of the topics I discuss:

  • Is it better to buy a used or new horse trailer?
  • The average cost of an aluminum two-horse trailer with living quarters
  • The average cost of a two-horse bumper-pull trailer
  • Where to find your best deals?

Buying your horse trailer: Used or new?

Having a horse trailer opens up many possibilities for you and your horse. Being able to take your horse on trail rides, use it in shows, and hauling it to a vet is just a few of many reasons why owning a horse trailer is beneficial.

Your horse trailer is one of the most important purchases you will make for yourself and your horse. Whether you are buying a used or new trailer, it is vitally important to do your research and know what you want from your trailer before purchasing.

If you simply want to take your horse to the vet, to local horse shows, or to equine events, then a simple two-horse trailer should suit you well enough.

However, if you want to transport multiple horses or plan to show your horse or take it on camping trips, it is best to opt for a large horse trailer with living quarters.

Your budget will dictate the kind of horse trailer you buy. The choice between a new or used trailer also depends on your budget. A good used trailer that has been well taken care of will be a much better deal than a brand new one.

Horse trailers generally depreciate by 25% every three years. Based on this, your savings can be substantial, especially if you’re shopping for an expensive model. You save 2,500 for every 10,000 spent on a used trailer!

If you choose to buy a used trailer to save money, then it is vital to know the pros and cons, and I have tabulated them for you.

Pros of buying a used horse trailerCons of buying a used horse trailer
Lower price. Your savings on a used trailer are typically 25% or greater. No warranty. Private party purchase means you forego service and warranties.
  
Smaller EMIs. If you plan on taking a loan for a used horse trailer, then your monthly payments will definitely be smaller than they’d be with a new trailer.Reliability – There is always a chance that you’d spend a lot on repairs. This is especially true if there is no warranty left.
  
Quick payoffs. You can quickly pay off the trailer within a short period.Lack of variety – with so many newer models of trailers coming in, you won’t get the same choices like colors, size, features, etc., in used trailers. Therefore, you’d need more flexibility and have to settle for what you get.

Also Read: 11 Tips to Back Up a Horse Trailer

The average cost of an aluminum two-horse trailer with living quarters

If you are a person who loves horses and spending time at horse shows, then you should consider a trailer with living quarters. The prices of them vary greatly because you can get them in many styles and options.

Some have multiple sleeping quarters, awnings, and even a small kitchen. A basic two-horse aluminum trailer with living quarters typically costs about $25,000.

In order to choose the right one for your needs, it’s good to know what to look out for when deciding on a trailer purchase. Here are the typical costs of aluminum trailers:

Slant-load trailer

Slant-load trailers are very popular, some people think they are safer and easier on horses than straight-load trailers. I wrote an article comparing slant and straight load trailers you may find helpful.

Most slant load trailers can carry anywhere between 2 and 8 horses. The price of a 2-horse slant load trailer is approximately $4,000-$10,000 depending on the weight, type of hitch, etc.

Living quarters

2-horse trailers with living quarters can cost anywhere between $20,000 to upwards of $100,000 depending on the level of luxury. 

Basic aluminum trailers for 2-horses

A basic 2-horse straight loading trailer can cost anywhere between $4,000 and $20,000, depending on the type of hitch. Such trailers have a manager or feeding area.

Basic livestock trailer

A basic livestock trailer without living quarters and windows – just slats for ventilation – can cost between $4,000 and $15,000.

Used horse trailers

Used trailers with living quarters start from $1000 to $60,000 depending on the year of manufacture, overall condition, weight, size, etc.

Find Out if Gooseneck or Bumper-Pull is Better for You!

Average cost of two-horse bumper pull trailers

Bumper pull horse trailers are convenient because they can be hitched to any towing vehicle and do not necessarily need a pickup truck.

A brand new bumper pull-horse trailer can cost between $10,000 and $30,000. Used ones are cheaper but be aware that options and sizes affect the prices. Compared to trailers with a gooseneck hitch, bumper-pull trailers cost a lot less.

Don’t let these numbers deter you. Today, there is a wide variety of horse trailers, and you are sure to find something to suit your needs.

Also Read: Are Bumper Pull Trailers Safe?

Costs of horse trailers with living quarters

Looking for a trailer with living quarters? There are many reasons why having one might be beneficial. For us, it was great having someplace to relax when we were at horse shows.

And it was also nice being able to take horses on weekend camping trips, and having the option of sleeping inside, showering (and even flushing) was wonderful.

You can buy a horse trailer with living quarters fully finished or ones that are basic, and you can add modifications as your preferences change. We purchased ours without A/C and added the option from a third party at half of the cost offered by the dealer.

I tabulated what horse trailer cost with living quarters in the table below:

BrandPrice
Sundown Trailer (2 horse slant, gooseneck hitch with dressing room)$8,500
Featherlite (4 horse slant)$16,295
Exiss (2022, 2 horse bumper pull slant load)$21,900
Trail Boss Custom Living Quarters (4 Horse, with living quarters)$120,000
Platinum Coach Outlaw (2022, 3H, living quarters)$123,000
Star Trailer (1 Horse, living quarters, gooseneck, straight load)$38,000
Picture of a gooseneck horse trailer.

Additional costs to consider when buying a trailer:

If you are in the market for a trailer, it is necessary to consider all of the additional costs of buying one. Not only will you need to purchase your desired trailer, but there are also fees such as registration and taxes.

Plus, you also need to get your truck ready for hauling; this includes special mirrors and hitches. The best way to know what kind of budget is needed for this type of project is by talking with friends who regularly haul horses or trailer dealerships.

  • Side view mirrors – anywhere between $10 to $450, depending on the type.
  • Installation of the hitch cost – $200 to $1,500, depending on the type of hitch.
  • Breakaway system with battery, switch, and wiring – $40 – $200
  • Ongoing repairs and maintenance
  • Insurance – to protect your trailer from collision, you need to shell out at least $30 per month on insurance.
  • License cost – $10 to $80, depending on your state.
  • Monthly maintenance

Also Read: Is Renting a Horse Trailer Better? Find Out!

Places to find the best deals on horse trailers

Word of mouth is the best way to find a quality horse trailer dealer. Talk with fellow equestrians and ask for recommendations from those who have purchased recently, so you know whom to trust when buying online or offline.

Here is a list of the top horse trailer dealers online:

Conclusion

A high-quality horse trailer is expensive for a reason. They ensure the safety and comfort of your horses, but they are also made with premium material to last you years down the road if cared for properly.

If you opt for one that has padded walls, hay storage or feeding area, gear hooks, comfortable rubber floors, then this will cost more money than someone who wants just an average basic model without these features.

In short: there isn’t really any way around it – buying a luxury-style horse trailer can be very costly depending on what all bells and whistles come equipped in it from day 1.

If you go in for a used trailer, make sure you pay attention to its safety features. The trailer should have adequate room for your horse/s and tack, and you should also feel comfortable hauling your horse in it. So, do take your time inspecting the trailer before you buy.

FAQs

Is it worth buying a horse trailer?

A horse trailer is indeed a worthwhile investment if you frequently haul horses to shows and equine events. Make sure you have the proper hauling vehicle for the trailer.

Why are horse trailers so expensive?

Horse trailers are expensive because they must be sturdy enough for long rides over bumpy roads while protecting the animal inside from injury. This requires heavy-duty axles, strong exteriors, and structural integrity, which is costly.

Do horse trailers hold their value?

A good horse trailer from a reliable manufacturer can hold some of its value for several years, but they do depreciate. You will naturally want to invest in the trailer’s upkeep and maintenance. Some brands offer a 5-years warranty, for a little extra, which can be worth it.

References

  1. https://horsesafield.com/how-much-does-a-horse-trailer-cost-trailers-for-every-budget/
  2. https://cars.costhelper.com/horse-trailer.html#:~:text=A%20basic%20two%2Dhorse%20straight,area%20for%20feed%20and%20storage.
  3. https://www.equesure.co.uk/contact-us/news-events/the-20-point-checklist-for-buying-a-second-hand-horse-trailer/